fragile-fences-2

fragile-fences

These are the sketches for the illustration to my resent story Closed Borders and a fast brainstorm for the name. The drawing is inspired by an old idea for a graphic novel I’m working on, a story that takes place in a world I’ve created. One day you hopefully will be able to read it in paper form.

Closed Borders is a story about the dangers of the way we are treating refugees in this world and the effects suffering has on us humans. Suffering causes violence. We can’t keep bombing and exploiting poor parts of the world and at the same time close the borders for those who want to get away from the poverty and war we in the rich part of the world are creating.

In a world where people were allowed to move freely, the resources will be better distributed. People would move where there are better possibilities of survival. The borders make sure the poor stays poor and the rich stays rich. In a world of limited resources wealth creates poverty, inequality creates conflict. 

By the same reasons high security banks are sometimes robbed and people sometimes escape from well guarded prisons, a border can never be completely closed. There is no better place to recruit terrorists than in an overpopulated refugee camp. We need to get people out of the camps.

When people really want to cross they do anyway, especially with a resourceful organisation in the back. The fence between the Spanish enclave Melilla and Marocco is one of the most surreal things I’ve ever seen. It looks like it’s taken from some kind of apocalyptic science fiction movie, and it’s still not enough to keep people out. Lots of people have been killed in the intent to get in.

Besides being morally wrong and discriminative, taking away people’s freedom is a strategy doomed to fail sooner or later. The closed borders are creating the problems they are supposed to protect against.

http://www.econ.upf.edu/~reynal/aer_final_conflict.pdf

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melilla_border_fence